24 February 2013

FO: Mathilde blouse

Ok, this post has it all, guys: drama, tears, joy and one hella lovely blouse.

I think at this point, this patterns needs no introduction: it's the Mathilde Blouse, by Tilly (she of the buttons). First off, if you haven't already, go buy it! You won't be sorry.

Mathilde Blouse

It's a lovely button-back blouse, with front yoke, vertical tucks and puffed sleeves. All that loveliness in just one blouse.

When Tilly blogged about her original makes, I was green with envy. And when she announced that it was available for sale, I didn't even pause to think about what an incredible achievement that was - I just had to have it. And I was Tilly's first customer! But of course, now I've had plenty of time to think about it, and gosh... what an achievement! It's lovely - no?
 
Unfortunately, the vertical tucks are a bit hidden by the busy print - but if you peer closely, they are there! I used a light cotton lawn - it's a very dark navy blue with a lollipop tree design. I wouldn't want to go much heavier with this blouse - the sleeves in particular might be a bit too stiff. One day, when I'm all grown up, I might try this with a slippery fabric. But for now, cotton lawn suits me fine!

Mathilde Blouse

I used wooden buttons for the back closure (is it ok to use my rubbish "you can't see the wood for the trees" joke here?). As you can see from this photo, I could probably take some ease out of the mid/lower back (but do let me know if you think that would be unwise).

The fit is great. I cut a 2 at the bust, grading to 5 at the hips. I also added 2" length at the bottom, and an extra button. I didn't lengthen the sleeves, but I did remove 4" fullness from the bottom of the sleeve, just because at this length on me the sleeves felt a bit too full. I think this level of puff is just right for me. (Puffed sleeves always make me think of Anne of Green Gables!)

I just love this blouse. I'll be making it up again - I like the thought of a contrast yoke and shorter sleeves.

Mathilde Blouse
One happy customer!

So where's all the drama I promised? What about those tears? Ok, so brace yourselves - the next photo is pretty upsetting:

Let this be a lesson to those of you tempted to sew past midnight, when you already feel a little bit tired and that voice in the back of your head says "let's just finish this up tomorrow". Listen to that voice. And don't think you're above putting pins at each end the buttonhole before getting the seam ripper out.

I can't believe how stupid I was, but the proof is there. I didn't do too bad a job patching it up though...

You can't really notice it unless you're looking for it, and I don't expect many people will be paying that much attention to my lower back in any case.

And on the subject of buttonholes, my sewing machine (a Janome DC 3050) has a one-step buttonhole function. Hooray in theory. But in practise, it's a real jerk about it: jamming up for no reason, deciding it's done half way through, or seemingly losing interest and just stopping. I gave my machine a really good clean last week, so I don't think it's due to a build up of fluff, and it seems to do everything else with no problem. And I used a new needle for this make. Has anyone else had a similar problem? Any suggestions on how to deal with it? The most annoying thing is that I'll do half a dozen test buttonholes with no problem, but when it comes to working on the garment, the machine just starts playing up. It's like it knows!!!!!! Double grrr.

The sums
2m cotton lawn: £20 (from Fabrics Galore)
Mathilde pattern: £7
8 x wooden buttons: £5
Thread / interfacing: stash
Total: £32

A tad pricer than the usual make, but worth every penny.
~

Anyway, next up...  I haven't forgotten about my Moss mini skirt, but I also just received my Deer & Doe Sureau pattern, and also have an itch to sew up another Renfrew. Do you sometimes feel paralysed by too much choice?

Speak soon
x

44 comments:

  1. That joke is so worth using! Bwah ha ha!
    Loving this make and that mending job is very well done! What a fabulous save :D

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  2. I can't believe how:
    1) good your make looks. You've definitely sold me on pairing the pattern with cotton lawn.
    2) much you did a good job resolving the catastrophe! You could never tell looking at the finished blouse.

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    1. thank you, Adrienne! Cotton lawn is my fabric of choice so I'm thrilled it works well with this pattern!

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  3. I love your version, particularly because of the less voluminous sleeves! They aren't really my thing as they are in the original pattern, but yours have just the right amount of puff.

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  4. This is gorgeous - I love the shape of it and the fabric you've chosen. I would say you're right though - it's only you who's ever going to know about the mistake as your mending looks really neat!
    I've done a bit of experimenting with the buttonhole function on my Bernina and can never get it to finish at the same point I start at - so I'm afraid I can't be any help to you with that. I hope you get it sorted out though.

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    1. Thanks Kathryn. I hope your machine behaves itself too! It's too annoying, especially as buttonholes are the last thing to do!

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  5. Gorgeous! I'm not quite sold on the pattern yet since I find higher necklines don't really suit me, but yours is beautiful! I have no idea how to help you with the buttonholes, in fact, I lost my buttonhole foot two months ago and have been avoiding functional buttons ever since. Blergh!

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    1. thanks Anneke! The neckline isn't too high - it's more of a boat-neck style. I'm not too fond of too-high necklines either!
      It turns out I only need the top button of this blouse to be functional, so perhaps next time, I'll sew the rest of it shut, and only add one buttonhole! much less stress!

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  6. Oh Shivani it's absolutely lovely, the style suits you so well, you look fab. I gasped out loud when I saw your buttonhole photo but you've done an incredible mending job. I bet this won't be your last Mathilde blouse! x

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    1. Thank you Jane! I am very pleased with it, and my mind is full of ideas for more!

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  7. Your Mathilde is gorgeous! I love your fabric; and I, too, gasped at the rip. You did a great job on fixing it. I've just finished my Mathilde today, and went with the full sleeves because they made me think of Adam Ant! Unfortunately I can't help re the buttonholes, my machine (an Elna) sometimes tries to do a smaller buttonhole, but generally it's ok. I hope you can get yours sorted out.

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    1. thanks Lynne! Looking foward to seeing your Mathilde!

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  8. Those close ups of the buttonhole disaster and fix are great - not only because your patching is so good, but also to get a good look at all the colours in the print. Lovely! Glad to see you made it work with less puffy sleeves too, it's been putting me off but I'm slowly coming round...

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    1. Thanks Jo - I'm so glad that I was able to save it, and that my repair job turned out so well... I've impressed myself!

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  9. It looks great Shivani! Don't stress about the buttonhole, I did exactly the same on the last of my 12 buttonholes on my Beignet and had to recut the piece! I feel your pain! x

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    1. Poor you! I definitely wouldn't have been able to recut the piece, so I'm glad I could save it! I am very tempted to just take my finished pieces to a professional buttonholer!

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  10. Shivani, you're a magician! You owned that buttonhole mishap and this is so, so beautiful. LOVE the fabric!

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    1. Thanks! I'm pretty pleased with it, I don't mind telling you!

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  11. Your blouse looks gorgeous!! Agree that lawn is the perfect weight for it and I love your fabric. What a lesson to learn! I too am guilty of sewing too late into the night and past my 'best', but you can't even notice.

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    1. Thank you Kirsty! I'm glad I was able to save it, but I don't think I'll play it so fast and loose again! Especially when armed with a seam ripper!

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  12. What a beautiful job! It really suits you and I love the trees (especially the silly puns). I like the sleeve alteration, I think I'd want to do something similar so it's good to see that change turn out so well.

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    1. Thanks Sarah! I love a good pun ;)

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  13. Looks lovely! Even looking for it, the repair is hard to find! :)

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  14. Another awesome fabric choice!
    My heart stopped when you showed that button-slice. I would have cried.
    This really really suits you. I don't know why I am not rushing to get a copy of ths pattern - it ticks all my boxes, and every one I have seen so far has been lovely.

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    1. My heart stopped too! I didn't cry (until after I'd saved it), but I think I went into shock and then crisis-management mode. I won't be doing that again.

      you should definitely give this pattern a go - it's SO you!!

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  15. So, so beautiful. You have done Tilly proud! Eek, those damnable seam rippers. Well rescued, my friend! Interesting to see it with a less full sleeve, also.

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  16. Beautiful! And top notch repair job - you'd never know anything had happened! I've had my fair share of those kinds of mishaps, and they almost always happen when I've been sewing too long and I'm tired :( When will we learn?

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    1. thanks Emma! So glad it isn't noticeable. I'm hoping this will teach me to stop sewing when I feel tired, but I think you're right... we probably won't learn! :)

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  17. Great blouse Shivani :) I like the less voluminous version of the sleeves you made too. Great job :)

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  18. OH MY GOODNESS, IT'S GORGEOUS!!!! I've been looking forward to seeing your version as I knew it would suit you and it just looks stunning on you. LOVE the fabric and the wooden buttons.

    And well done for fixing that buttonhole rip! How did you fix it? Share with us? x

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    1. Thanks Tilly! I just love the pattern - it's beautifully drafted! I'll do a follow-up post about how I fixed the rip - it would be interesting to hear of alternative solutions. x

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  19. It's lovely! It really suits you. Great idea to reduce the sleeve puff, that's the one thing I would also change about the pattern as that's not really my style. I'm sure you'll be making a few more of these.

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  20. Love what you did with this pattern, I like it with the little bit less fullness in the sleeves...

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  21. It's lovely and i really like your version of the sleeve. I've commented before on Did You Make That that it's the puffiness of the sleeves that have stopped me buying this pattern so far. Your's are far more "me" though.

    Have you tried completely re-threading the machine (including bobbin)? No idea why, but it seems to work when I have similar issues with button holes. Even when my practise version has worked absolutely fine just moments before! I do have a different machine though.

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  22. I love your choice of fabric. It looks perfect on you.

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  23. This looks really great, I'm doing a bit of research into the blouse to see if I could manage it myself and I love how you took some fabric out of the arms so it's a bit less 'poofy' a top tip I'll be borrowing if you dont mind :)

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  24. Lovely blouse! Last night I was up well past midnight making a very belated Little Geranium dress for a baby shower and as I was finishing the buttonholes I thought of this post... and then proceeded to take my seam ripper on a much longer journey than intended! Right through the side of the buttonhole and well into the bodice. So I second listening to the "Finish it up tomorrow" voice. Wish I had! Sara

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